Marilyn Monroe’s Strange  Death

SUICIDE, ACCIDENT OR MURDER?

Iconic Actress
(1 June 1926 – 5 August 1962)

Born Norma Jean Mortenson (Baker) in 1926 she later changed her name to Marilyn Monroe as she believed it more suitable to a career as an actress and model. In 1946 she received critical acclaim for her acting and within ten years was a movie icon and worldwide sex symbol.  Her strange death has attracted almost as much publicity as her life did.

Not an easy person to work with, she also had a series of dangerous and troubled relationships with powerful men including John F. Kennedy – President of the USA, who were attracted to her sex appeal and celebrity status.

Marilyn Monroe was found dead on 5th August 1962. The official verdict was accidental Nembutal overdose but many people believe there is evidence that suggests otherwise.  For one thing  Marilyn had a poor memory and it was well known she kept a detailed and therefore dangerous diary which has never been found.  She had also received several pieces of very good news and was said to be in a very positive state of mind.

The original suggestion that their was something strange about her death and that she had actually been murdered came from a self-published pamphlet ‘The Strange Death of Marilyn Monroe (1964)’  written by anti-communist activist, Frank Capell, in which he proposed that her death was part of a conspiracy. He claimed that Monroe and Robert F. Kennedy had an affair, which she took too seriously and was threatening to cause a scandal; Kennedy or the CIA therefore ordered her to be assassinated to protect his career.

Several reports claim she had hidden needle tracks in her rectum and her death could not have been more fortunate in its timing. There is no doubt that what she knew was a grave threat to the reputations of many people who would not hesitate to simply eliminate a psychologically disturbed actress.

There are many conspiracy theories surrounding her death that range from government cover up’s to manslaughter by medical negligence.